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The Brazil world cup will be one of the largest and connected World Cups.   So how do they connect 80,000 fans?  The BBC, Huawei and several other have been answering this question online…so how do they do it?

The BBC article sates that “Brazil last year, for one, had over 70 million 3G users – a number expected to grow to 130 million by the end of 2014.

Telecom companies came through on their pledge to have 4G cellphone signal available in all 12 cities hosting the games.  However,  only six of the 12 World Cup stadiums will offer free wi-fi so fans can connect to the Internet. Wi-fi service will not be ready in time at the stadiums in Sao Paulo, Curitiba, Recife, Fortaleza, Natal and Belo Horizonte. At Curitiba and Cuiaba stadiums, the telecom industry said there was no time to set up the best possible cell signal.

Part of the reason for such an explosion of online connectivity is the 2014 FIFA World Cup, which will take place from 12 June and be hosted in 12 of the country’s national stadiums.

However, providing supportive technology to connect tens of thousands of stadium-goers simultaneously is still a challenge. For example, there are pressures for Brazil to accommodate its international guests and ensure that they are able to share their World Cup experience with friends and family back home.

High-density wireless networks, which are mounted under the floor, to the sides and on the roof, are one solution to this challenge. This technology was introduced in 2012, when electronics company Huawei teamed up with Germany’s Signal Iduna Park Stadium (formerly the 2006 FIFA World Cup Stadium Dortmund) to provide a full range of networking products, including wireless WLAN, routers and firewalls, so that 40,000 fans could simultaneously connect to the internet.

The Signal Iduna Park was consequently one of the first sporting venues to become known as a Connected Stadium, so-called because audience spectators are encouraged to interact online, via tablet or mobile devices.

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